Hair

The Hairy Truth about Velaterapia

Monday, 13th July 2015by culture HQ
And in this week's edition of crazy hair trends to hit the web comes velaterapia - or the literal burning off of split ends.

WHILST WE’RE ALL FOR AN OBSCURE NEW HAIR TREND (LOOKIN’ AT YOU, SAND ART INSPIRED HAIR), THIS LATEST ONE HAS THE CULTURE TEAM A LITTLE  UNSURE. INTRODUCING VELATERAPIA – OR THE BURNING OFF OF SPLIT ENDS. BELOVED BY SUPERMODELS, THE TREATMENT HAS GOTTEN PRETTY DAMN CLOSE TO BREAKING THE INTERNET THIS WEEK… BUT IS IT SAFE, AND IF SO SHOULD ONE INDULGE IN A LITTLE HAIR BURNING FOR THE SAKE OF BEAUTY?

Thought to have originated in Brazil in the 1960’s, velaterapia is the latest in a long list of seemingly questionable trends to hit the online beauty spectre. The debate as to the safety of this particular trend was ignited (no pun intended) last week following an image of Victoria’s Secret model Alessandria Ambrosio’s receiving the treatment, and caught on quickly.

Regardless of celebrity endorsement, why would one willingly take to their hair with a naked flame (well, actually, pay upwards of $200 to have someone do it for them)? With benefits of the treatment – which involves a stylist twisting segments of hair and then lightly burning with a flame – allegedly including the eradication of split ends and fly aways, it’s been a beauty regime must for some of Brazil’s most beautiful people for years.

The problem with this particular trend is the fact that there is a very real possibility of risk for those who attempt it at home – and whilst literally setting your head on fire may seem like a pretty bad idea to the vast majority of us, often with celebrity endorsement comes instances of curious fans trying whatever miracle cure is being spruiked for themselves away from the experienced hand of a professional.

Is it safe? Whilst technically yes – when performed in a professional setting by a trained stylist – the treatment is safe and can act to improve split ends initially, it actually weakens the hair over the long term according to experts. With fans claiming that the major selling point of velaterapia is in its alleged cauterisation of the hair, one must remember that unlike broken or infected skin, hair doesn’t actually require cauterisation when broken… Arguably rendering the treatment useless.

Still interested in taking a leaf out of Alessandria’s book and trying the controversial treatment for yourself? Have you received velaterapia in the past? As we have no first hand experience with this particular trend, we want to hear from those in the know… You! Let us know on Facebook what you think of this particular trend!


Monday, 13th July 2015by culture HQ